HISTORY AND TRADITIONS

HISTORY AND TRADITIONS

The Hampton University School of Nursing has prepared qualified nurses to serve humanity for more than a century.  The school was founded in 1891, and proudly holds the distinction of being the oldest continuous baccalaureate nursing program in the commonwealth of Virginia.  The program is designed to meet almost every student's needs, by offering traditional baccalaureate degrees in Nursing and Health Sciences, master's degrees in the roles of nurse practitioner, administrator, and educator, and a doctoral degree in family and family related nursing research or nursing education.

“We are very proud of our heritage and will continue to uphold the Standard of Excellence as we strive towards becoming the number one producer of multicultural nurses with advanced degrees in the United States,” said Dr. Shevellanie Lott, HU School of Nursing Dean. “Our administration and faculty are committed to ensuring the program continues for another 125 years.”

1891The Kings Chapel Hospital for Colored and Indian Boys, Abbey Mae Infirmary, and the Hampton Training School for Nurses were started on the campus of Hampton Institute. Alice Bacon was instrumental in starting the Hampton Training School for Nurses. The school was commonly called Dixie Hospital, and its first graduate was Anna DeCosta Banks.
1931Nina Gage appointed director of the Hampton Training School for Nurses.
Students earned a diploma from a three-year program from Hampton Institute.
1934Ruth J. Hopper appointed director (1934-1936).
1936Clara G. Lewis appointed director (1936-1939).
1943J. Henry Suttergood, chairman of the Board of Trustees of Hampton Institute, sought approval for a nursing program. Program provisions were made in the 1943-44 budget.
Mary Elizabeth Lancaster (Carnegie) appointed acting director of the Division of Nurse Education. She implemented the  baccalaureate nursing program.
1944Cecile E. Authier appointed director of the Division of Nurse Education.
Professional nursing courses were taught on affiliations, sometimes in distant cities: St. Philip School of Nursing in Richmond, Virginia; Brooklyn State Hospital in Brooklyn, New York; Union of the King's Daughter's; and the Visiting Nurse Service, Norfolk, Virginia.
Due to limited clinical opportunities for African Americans, clinical affiliations in public health were expanded to Staten Island, New York; Washington DC; and Bayonne and Hackensack, New Jersey.
1946Five students graduated from Hampton's Cadet Nurse Corps.
1952The nursing program received temporary accreditation from the National League for Nursing.
1953Helen M. Sellers appointed acting director of the Division of Nurse Education.
1957Harriet E. Broward appointed director of the Division of Nursing.
1963Fostine G. Riddick appointed director of the Hampton Institute Division of Nursing.
1967Undergraduate nursing program received full National League for Nursing accreditation.
William Freeman Hall was designed by the nursing faculty and completed.
1968Registered Nurse Program received National League for Nursing accreditation.
1971Dr. Lois B. Sellers appointed director of the Division of Nursing. She was the first African American nurse to serve on the State Board of Nursing.
1975First continuing education nursing program established at Hampton Institute.
1976Master's program initiated–the first ever at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU).
Chi Eta Phi Sorority chartered a chapter on campus.
1977Dr. Patricia E. Sloan established the M. Elizabeth Carnegie Nursing Archives, the first archives in the US designed as a repository for memorabilia on minority nurses, especially African American nurses.
1978The first annual National Conference on the Black Family held by the Nursing Department.
1979Master's program accredited by the National League for Nursing.
1980Dr. Elnora D. Daniel appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
Sigma Theta Tau, National Honor Society, established a chapter on campus.
1986The Hampton University Interdisciplinary Nursing Center for Health and Wellness, which was later renamed the Nursing Center, was established.
Dr. Elnora D. Daniel, dean of the School of Nursing, became the second African American appointed to the Virginia State Board of Nursing and its first African American president.
1990The School of Nursing receives its first NIMH research grant.
The Teagle LPN to BS initiative began.
1991Dr. Bertha L. Davis appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
1996Dr. Arlene J. Montgomery appointed interim dean of the School of Nursing.
1998Dr. Pamela V. Hammond appointed dean of the School of Nursing
1999PhD program initiated – the first ever at a HBCU.
2000The Hampton University Pre-Entry Program (HU-PREP) funded through DHHS.
2001The School of Nursing was reaccredited for 8 years by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission and for 10 years by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.
2002School of Nursing signed articulation agreement with Bermuda College.
Dr. Phyllis Henderson became the first student to graduate from the School of Nursing's doctoral program.
2003School celebrated the 25 Anniversary of the Annual Conference on the Black Family.
The School of Nursing pioneered a new 3-year accelerated baccalaureate program at the Hampton University College of Virginia Beach.
2004School celebrated the 60 Anniversary of Baccalaureate Education with a Gala entitled “60 Years of Baccalaureate Education: Caring for Families through Generations.”
Dr. Constance Smith-Hendricks appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
2005Virginia Board Nursing visit for Main Campus and College of Virginia Beach School of Nursing Programs received 8 years of approval for both programs.
First graduates from the College of Virginia Beach Nursing Program
2007Dr. Pamela Hammond appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
2009Dr. Arlene J. Montgomery appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
2011Dr. Hilda Williamson appointed interim dean of the School of Nursing.
Dr. Deborah E. Jones appointed dean of the School of Nursing.
2013

Dr. Lois Price-Spratlen Endowed Chair in Community and Mental Health Established.

Dr. Thaddeus Spratlen established the Nursing Class of 1954 Endowed Scholarship.

2015Dr. Hilda M. Williamson appointed interim dean of the School of Nursing.
2016

Dr. Shevellanie E. Lott appointed dean of the School of Nursing.The baccalaureate program was re-accredited for 10 years by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

The baccalaureate program was re-accredited for 10 years by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

2017

School celebrated the 125th anniversary of nursing education at Hampton University and received full Board of Nursing approval for 10 years.

Implemented the Bachelors of Science in Health Science degree with two concentrations: Community Health Promotion and Policy Administration.

2018The school celebrated the 75th Anniversary of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, which continues to be the oldest baccalaureate program in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
2019

The School of Nursing hosted the 41st Conference on the Black Family titled: Health of the Black Family: How to Add Years to your Life and Life to your years.  The keynote speaker was Dr. L.D. Britt and the honored family was Mr. and Mrs. Charlie and Bethune Hill.

First graduates of the Bachelors in Health Sciences program in Community Health Promotion and Policy and Administration - Kierrah Friend, Kazhmira Foster, Brittany Johnson, Latasha Johnson, Nicole King, Cameron Meade, Chyanne Parkinson, Dasia Thompson and Aliyah Williams.

The School of Nursing established the Gerontology Center of Excellence and a minor in Gerontology.  Dr. Ethlyn Gibson was appointed director and Program Coordinator.

The School of Nursing’s pin is a representation of the middle of the Hampton University seal. The official seal was accepted in 1875 and only the name has changed as Hampton has evolved from the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute to Hampton Institute to Hampton University.

The symbols on the seal and the pin are a plow and sheaths of grain; books of knowledge surmounted by a globe of the world; a bible stand; and, an old-fashioned printing press. The sunrise over Hampton Creek symbolizes the rise of educational opportunities, and the boat on the water symbolizes the principal medium of transportation to Hampton during its early history.

The nurse’s cap was designed after a nurse’s habit, as a way to pay homage to the work of nuns as the earliest nurses. The cap’s original use of the nurse’s cap was to keep a female nurse’s hair neatly in place and present a professional appearance. Over the course of time the nurse’s cap evolved into two styles. One is a long nurse’s cap which covers most of the nurse’s head and the other is a short nurse’s cap which sits on top of the head.

 

The nurse’s cap has also had a ceremonial purpose. For many years the nurse’s cap was used in a ceremony for new nurses. The capping ceremony was instituted as a way to present a nurses cap to students who have completed school work prior to beginning hospital training.

 

The nurse’s cap has undergone several changes throughout the years. The origin of the cap was the habit that nuns wore. Over the years, the nurse’s cap has evolved from a large cap, which virtually covered the entire head of a nurse to the current version which is just a small cap which sits on top of the nurses head.

 

However, over the course of time, the nurse’s cap has been used less and less. In some hospitals, the cap is still used by nurses. However, due to concerns of the cap being a carrier of bacteria, the cap has been. Also, with the increasing number of men in the nursing profession, the nurse’s cap has gone away being replaced by nursing scrubs.

 

While the nurse’s cap is not widely used in the modern era, the cap still has an important place in the history of nursing. From the days to Florence Nightingale to the present day capping ceremonies, a nurse’s cap is a symbol of one of the noblest professions nursing.

The School of Nursing hosted it's first White Coat Ceremony 1###.  The White Coat Ceremony was designed by The Arnold P. Gold Foundation (APGF) as a way to welcome new students into the medical profession and to set clear expectations regarding their primary role as physicians by professing an oath. Today, the Ceremony emphasizes the importance of compassion-ate care as well as scientific proficiency.

The first White Coat Ceremony took place in 1993 at the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. Grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 1996 and 1997 made widespread advocacy of the White Coat Ceremony possible.  The pin is personally placed on each student’s shoulders by individuals who believe in the students’ ability to carry on the noble tradition of doctoring. It is a personally delivered gift of faith, confidence and compassion.

To capitalize on the success of this widely hailed program and its positive impact on compassionate patient care, The Arnold P. Gold Foundation and AACN are supporting expanding the White Coat Ceremony to nursing.

In 2014 the APGF partnered with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to provide support for piloting of the White Coat Ceremony at 100 nursing schools. The specially designed pin serves as a visual reminder of the students’ oath and commitment to provide compassionate and high quality care.